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Showing posts from September, 2014

YARDLEY BRINGS MURDER AND WHIMSY TO MADHOUSE

Elegant Murder and Tragic Prose are in the Stars This Fall Mercedes M. Yardley ’ s New Release is Nothing Short of Beautiful Monday, September 8th — Crestview Hills, KY —“ Murder and whimsy. ” These things may sound incompatible, but dark fantasy author Mercedes M. Yardley ’ s latest novel manages to entwine the two concepts with lyrical language, beautiful imagery — and a high body count. Ragnarok Publications is proud to announce the release of Pretty Little Dead Girls: A Novel of Murder and Whimsy , coming on September 29th. A dark but lovely fairy tale, this is Yardley at her finest: a tapestry of lush imagery, poetic prose, and beautiful violence about a woman destined to be murdered and her flight from Fate ’ s inevitable — yet seemingly terrible — marksmanship. Yardley ’ s fans are no strangers to her lovely, tragic style. She is also the author of the acclaimed novella “ Apocalyptic Montessa and Nuclear Lulu: A Tale of Atomic Love ” , winner of the 2013 Redd

ATTENTION: Wytovich Throws Lawrence C. Connoly in Madhouse

On Ghosts, Revenants, and Revision By Lawrence C. Connolly Copyright © 2014 by Lawrence C. Connolly Lately, I’ve been contemplating ghosts. I don’t mean the revenants of dead people, but rather the specters of books that were never born. Titles such as Harlan Ellison’s Blood’s a Rover , a yet-to-be published book that I saw advertised for release from Ace in the early 1980s, or the Orchises Press edition of J. D. Salinger’s Hapworth 16, 1924 , which received considerable advance notice in 1996 before the author pulled the rights. Sometimes these ghosts achieve a semblance of existence, usually after the authors are no longer around to stand in their way. Such releases are almost always incomplete and appended with editorial notes to outline what might have been (or worse, finished and revised by literary continuators who claim to know the authors’ true intensions). In the early 1970s, the always eccentric Truman Capote referred to his long delayed Answered Prayer